Skip to main content

Search results

Showing 41 - 50 of 218 results. Order by:
Report cover image showing joined hands

Developing Effective Services for Older People

“Older people are major users of public services and many of them find the divisions between service providers confusing. Often those most in need have to contact the largest number of agencies.

“The Government has been successful in finding new ways of developing services for older people that are joined up and avoid duplication. But there is scope to build on this. Improved co-ordination across government on older people’s issues could be addressed by the publication of an Older People strategy. At the same time, Government must ensure it continues to provide feedback to those it consults in order to maintain commitment and to avoid raising expectations that are later undermined”.

Published:
26 Mar 2003
Report cover image of doctor at work

Dr Foster Intelligence: A joint venture between the Information Centre and Dr Foster LLP

“Bringing together the best of the public and private sector has clear benefits in improving the quality of public sector services. But in such cases attention must be paid to protecting government spending and value for money for the taxpayer. By taking the decision not to carry out a formal competitive tender process in this instance, the Department cannot demonstrate that the joint venture was the best structure to meet its needs or that it represents good value for money.

Published:
6 Feb 2007
Report cover showing doctors training staff on a dummy

Educating and Training the Future Health Professional Workforce for England

“Educating and training increased numbers of nursing, midwifery and other health professional students is a key way of overcoming the shortage of such staff in the NHS. The NHS and higher education institutions must continue working together to improve value for money, to ensure more students complete courses, to reduce the constraints on providing practical experience, and to invest in new capacity where needed. Healthcare professionals provide much of the service that patients need and expect, and a cost effective world class education and training system must be the foundation for delivering this.”

Sir Andrew Foster, the Controller of the Audit Commission, said today:

“Healthcare staff are the lifeblood of the NHS. Developing their skills and abilities is vital both to the quality of patient care and the modernisation of the NHS. We need to actively manage and plan for the training of our nurses, therapists and other staff. Everyone, from front-line staff to trust board members, must show commitment to a culture which values and expects training and learning.”

The Audit Commission’s Hidden Talents report focuses on the existing healthcare workforce and looks at how trusts can get the best value from their training and development activities. The National Audit Office’s report to Parliament, Educating and Training the Future Health Professional Workforce for England, reviews the effectiveness of arrangements between the NHS and higher education institutions for educating and training pre-registration health professional students.

The detailed findings of the two reports are set out in the attached annexes.

Published:
1 Mar 2001
report cover showing the entrance to St Christopher's hospice

End of life care

“Good end of life care should mean that people are treated with dignity and respect and, where possible, in their preferred place of care. Some people receive high standards of care in their final weeks, days and hours, but others do not. Organisations responsible for the care of people approaching the end of their life need to improve the planning and delivery of services, particularly support in the community. There is scope to make these improvements by using both existing and planned additional resources more efficiently and effectively.”

Published:
26 Nov 2008
Report cover showing an older patient

Ensuring the effective discharge of older patients from NHS acute hospitals

“Many tens of thousands of older people each year find themselves unable to leave hospital, even though their treatment has been completed. This significantly reduces their quality of life and undermines the ability of hospitals to treat more patients and meet testing targets.

“The Department of Health has made strides in the last 18 months to address this problem but the pressures on the health and social care systems are unrelenting. This is a classic case of the need for ‘joined-up government’ with the NHS, local authorities and private and voluntary sector care providers working together. The Department should ensure that it is doing everything it can to allow this to happen.”

Published:
12 Feb 2003