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Working with the Third Sector

“Community and voluntary organisations play a vital role in delivering public services. When engaging with the third sector, departments need to be clear as to whether they are “shopping” (buying a service), “giving” (supporting a worthy cause) or “investing” (building capacity in the sector) and adapt their approach to funding accordingly. Developing shared centres of expertise across departments would enhance effectiveness in working with the third sector through, for example, application of specialist procurement skills. They would also assist in streamlining monitoring processes and building relationships based on trust and professionalism thereby securing the full contribution which the third sector can make.”

29 Jun 2005
UK Passport

Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre

It is important that the services for vulnerable people at the Yarls Wood Immigration Removal Centre are delivered ‘right first time’ and this did not happen here. Steps are now being taken to address the problems but 35% of the recommendations from Her Majesty’s Inspector of Prisons’ 2015 inspection have not yet been implemented.

7 Jul 2016

Yorkshire Forward. Independent Performance Assessment, 2007

The Regional Development Agencies Advantage West Midlands, East Midlands Development Agency and Yorkshire Forward are all performing strongly, according to an independent assessment conducted by the National Audit Office. The National Audit Office has been examining the performance of Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) and making assessments of performance in five areas: ambition, prioritisation, capacity, performance … Read more

13 Mar 2007

Youth Offending: the delivery of community and custodial sentences

“The Youth Justice Board has done much to implement reforms to the youth justice system, but more needs to be done to rehabilitate young offenders within the community to reduce risks of reoffending. The movement of young offenders from one institution to another can be unsettling for offenders, breaking developing relationships with those responsible for their supervision, and disrupting educational and other programmes intended to help prevent reoffending. Better assessment of custodial needs, and more recognition of offenders’ progress with their programmes when deciding who to move, would be beneficial.

“And better co-ordination by all agencies involved in supervising young offenders in the community or in providing appropriate support services for such young people would reduce uncertainty for some offenders about accommodation, education or employment on completion of their sentence.”

21 Jan 2004